American History for Home Schools, 1607 to 1885, With a Focus on Our Civil War

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Sixteen historians, all members of The Society of Independent Southern Historians, have come together to write this truthful history of America specifically for Home Schooled students. Herein is a history that is truthful, concise, y…
Sixteen historians, all members of The Society of Independent Southern Historians, have come together to write this truthful history of America specifically for Home Schooled students. Herein is a history that is truthful, concise, yet comprehensive, written especially for students of middle school and high school age and for the parents who provide guidance through the home school educational approach. The 40 student lessons in this book present 278 years of our history; from the founding of Jamestown, Virginia Colony to the restoration of a healthy balance in American politics around 1885. Each lesson (or chapter) includes suggestions for student discussion and lists a few resources for further study.\nSection One: The Evolution of Two Cultures – North and South – From 1607 to 1860\nChapter 1 -- Origins of the Northern and Southern Cultures, 1600s and 1700s, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 2 – The First American War for Independence, by Vance Caswell of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 3 -- Thirteen Free and Independent States Join in a Constitution; George Washington Presides Over the New Common Government; Alexander Hamilton Has an Agenda and Thomas Jefferson Disagrees, 1783 – 1800, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 4 -- The Virginia Dynasty: Spectacular Growth of the Union of the States, 1801 – 1824, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 5 -- Expansion and Conflict of the Northern and Southern Cultures to 1860, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 6 -- Westward Expansion to the Pacific and Efforts by Two Cultures to Control Political Power, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 7 – Southerners Found the Republic of Texas\nSection Two: African Americans in the Southern Culture\nChapter 8 – African-American Bondage in World Perspective, by Vance Caswell of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 9 – More on Americans of African Descent, by Barbara Marthal of Tennessee, M. Ed., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 10 – Characteristics of the African American People During the 1850's, by Leslie R. Tucker, Ph.D. of Oklahoma, S. I. S. H.\nSection Three: The Rise of Political Sectionalism in the Northern States, Inciting Secession\nChapter 11 – The Mexican War, Expansion to California, and the “Compromises of 1850,” by Egon Richard Tausch of Texas, S. I. S. H.\nChapter 12 – Understanding the conflict between the North and South over the Role of the Federal Government in the Economy, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 13 – Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the Anti-Slavery Movement in the Northern States and the Necessity of Understanding the Divergent Passions for Exclusionism, Deportationism and Abolitionism, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 14 – Bleeding Kansas, the Emigrant Aid Societies and John Brown – a Story of 1850’s Political Prejudice, Terrorism and Propaganda, pitting the Northern against the Southern Cultures, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S.I.S.H\nChapter 15 – The Rise of Political Sectionalism in the Northern States, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nSection Four: The War Between the States, Including State Secession, President Lincoln’s Response, Four Years of War, the POW Story, and the African American Story.\nChapter 16 – The Nature of the Union and the Right of State Secession, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 17 – The Secession of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, the Birth of the Confederate States of America, and the Election of Jefferson Davis, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S.I.S.H\nChapter 18 – The Response to Secession by President Lincoln and the Republican Governors of the Northern States: Their Fort Sumter “First Shot” Strategy to Launch the Subjugation of Democrat Border States and Proceed with the Invasion, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 19 – In Response to Lincoln’s War Proclamation, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas Secede, and the Civilized Native American Nations Choose Sides, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 20 – Federal Military Occupation of the Border States, 1861 – 1865, by Clyde N. Wilson of S. C., Ph.D., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 21 – Fourteen Battles in Four Years of War, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 22 – Abraham Lincoln: Fact and Fiction, by Vance Caswell of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 23 – Comparing the Two Armies with Regard to Size, Leadership, Resourcefulness, Materiel, Commitment, etc., by Steve Litteral of Illinois, S.I.S.H.\nChapter 24 – The Federal War Against Southern Civilians, by Karen Stokes of S. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 25 – Pondering Why Slaves Refrained from Attacking Owners’ Families, by Patrick J. Kealey of California, S. I. S. H.\nChapter 26 – The Story of African American Support of Confederate Forces and, during 1863-1865, of those Inducted into Federal African American Regiments, by Earl L. Ijames of N. C., S.I.S.H.\nChapter 27 – The Sufferings of the Prisoners of War and Why it Happened, by Karen Stokes of S. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 28 – A Personal Story of a Tennessee Family and a South Carolina Family, by Howard Ray and Judith Willis White of N. C., S. I. S. H.\nSection Five: After the Conquest – Consequences of Political Sectionalism and Horrific War\nChapter 29 – The Cost of the War in Lives Lost and Families Shattered, by William Cawthon of Alabama, S.I.S.H.\nChapter 30 – The Cost of the War in Financial Terms, by Joseph Stromberg of Georgia, S.I.S.H.\nChapter 31 – The Cost of the War to the Northern States – They Also Lost Their State Rights, by Steve Litteral of Illinois, S.I.S.H.\nChapter 32 – Political Reconstruction in Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Kentucky and Missouri, by Joyce Bennett of Maryland, S. I. S. H.\nChapter 33 – Political Reconstruction in the Defeated Southern States, by Egon Richard Tausch of Texas, S.I.S.H.\nChapter 34 – How Political Reconstruction Affected the Lives of African American People and Native American People, by Gail Jarvis of Georgia, S. I. S. H.\nChapter 35 – How Political Reconstruction Affected the Lives of the White Southern People, by Gail Jarvis of Georgia, S. I. S. H.\nSection Six: Discussion Subjects and Concluding Information.\nChapter 36 – “Recapping the Big Puzzle:” Simply Understanding Why the War Between the States was Not “About” Slavery, by Paul C. Graham of S. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 37: What If Bonded African Americans (Slaves) Had Benefitted from Gradual Emancipation with Training and Freedom from Political Agendas?, by Barbara G. Marthal of Tennessee, M. Ed., S. I. S. H,\nChapter 38 – What Was the War of 1861-1865 All About?, by H. V. Traywick, Jr. of Virginia, S.I.S.H.\nChapter 39 – How and Why to Study History, by Howard Ray White of N. C., S. I. S. H.\nChapter 40 – Thanks to Our Authors and Our Encouragement to Student Readers, by Howard Ray White of N. C., co-editor, S.I.S.H.\nAppendix 1: Our List of Society Members Who Wrote this Work and a Bit about Each.\nAppendix 2: Resources for Further Study, by Dr. Clyde N. Wilson and Howard Ray White, co-editors.

Product Details

Author
Written by 16 members of the Society of Independent Southern Historians
Pages
46
Cover
Paperback
Details
40 lessons, For middle school or high school kids

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